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7th INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON TECHNICAL DIAGNOSTICS
2021
Congress START

We regret to inform you that the 7th International Congress on Technical Diagnostics (7th ICTD – Radom POLAND 2020)
is postponed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The global character of Congress requires strong participation from around the world.

The decision seems necessary to ensure the security of our participants, international nature and implementation
of the objectives of the Congress.

The details about the 2021 edition of the Congress will be given as soon as possible.

7th International Congress on Technical Diagnostics  (7th ICTD) is scheduled in 2021 in Radom – POLAND. This congress will be held at Kazimierz Pulaski University of Technology and Humanities under the patronage of the Polish Society of Technical Diagnostics.

ICTD is an international refereed congress organized cyclically in Poland, every four years dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practices in technical diagnostics. The idea of the congress is to provide an international platform to all the world developers and researchers to share ideas and latest concepts on the diagnostics of machines, constructions, materials and industrial processes as well as maintenance of all kinds of technical facilities.

Congress will be the opportunity to take advantage of the digital transformation of mechanical engineering and connected technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution I4.0 our society will build on.

Congress topics

7th ICTD 2020 concerns the theory and practices of technical diagnostics in:
• mechanical engineering,
• automotive engineering,
• civil engineering and transport,
• production engineering,
• computer engineering,
• materials engineering,
• mining and energy,
• electronics and robotics,
• maritime and military industry,
• food industry,
• medicine.

Keynote Speakers

Professor Tomasz Krysiński 

Research and Innovation Director at Airbus Helicopter

Tomasz Krysinski re-joined Airbus Helicopters as Vice-President Research and Innovation in May 2014. In his role, he contributes to the definition and the cascading fo the company strategy & objectives, communicate and translate these into a clear set of implementation activities; ensure their successful delivery across the company.
From 2011 to May 2014 Mr. Krysinski was in charge of the innovation laboratory at PSA Peugeot Citroën.
Tomasz Krysinski joined Aérospatiale (which later became Eurocopter and then Airbus Helicopters) as an aerodynamics engineer in 1986, and was involved in the development of most of their helicopter product range, including the hybrid high-speed demonstrator X3, as Chief Engineer, and the combat helicopter Tiger.
Mr Krysinski who was born in Lodz in Poland holds a Master of Engineering from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers (ENSAM) Paris and the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Pétroles et des Moteurs (IFP) as well as a Master of Science in Energy Processes from Université Paris VI.

“Advanced Diagnostics in Aviation”

To be announced

Professor Andrew Ball  

Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research and Enterprise 

Professor of Diagnostic Engineering at the University of Huddersfield

Professor Andrew Ball is Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research and Enterprise and Professor of Diagnostic Engineering at the University of Huddersfield. Andrew’s personal research expertise is in the detection and diagnosis of faults in mechanical, electrical and electro-hydraulic machines, in data analysis and signal processing, and in measurement systems and sensor development. He is the author of over 300 technical and professional publications, and he has spent a large amount of time lecturing and consulting to industry in all parts of the world. Andrew has to date graduated almost 100 doctoral degrees and he has acted as external examiner at over 50 institutions. He holds visiting and honorary positions at 6 overseas universities, he sits on 3 large corporate scientific advisory boards, and he is also a Registered Expert Witness in 3 countries. His H-index is >40 and his i10 is >120.

“Be careful what you wait for”

I’ve been a maintenance engineer for over 30 years, and all of this time I have been waiting. I’ve been waiting for maintenance engineering to shed its stereotypes of oily rags, adjustable spanners and scuffed knuckles. I’ve been waiting for the word “maintenance” to stop being synonymous with the word “breakdown”. I’ve been waiting for maintenance engineering to be recognised for what it is: a cutting edge technical discipline which is critical to world class industrial performance.

Having almost given up, thinking that I’d be retired before anything ever changed, about a 18months ago I got a boost of hope, thanks to a market growth report for condition monitoring systems. Since then there’s been a snowball effect – there is no doubt that the world now sees predictive maintenance as the key to achieving the benefits of Industry 4.0. Fantastic! Surely, that’s job done?

Initially I thought that it was, it was clear that my wait was over, and that world class maintenance was being duly recognised for just how important it really is. All of this was  coming from within the engineering / industrial community, with generous and helpful input from data scientists. But then something a bit scary started to happen: the discussions about the future of predictive maintenance started to be led by data scientists rather than by engineers. And then I got a bit worried.

Don’t get me wrong, I am no Luddite, I have no aversion to data science or data driven methods; indeed over the years I’ve developed very capable data driven fault detection methods, but if there’s one thing I’ve learned about the automation of machinery diagnosis and prognosis, it’s that engineering know-how and context are critical to accurate and timely decision making.

I’ve heard presentations in recent conferences about purely data driven approaches to predictive maintenance – given by people with zero knowledge of engineering. Clearly, this is dangerous. Data driven methods are truly excellent for identifying patterns within large and complex data sets, for detecting anomalies, for fault detection. But for fault diagnosis and prognosis, you must have context and engineering experience – these things cannot be achieved by purely data driven approaches – indeed it highly unlikely that there will be sufficient example data to allow it.

So, I firmly believe that the future of world class maintenance needs to be a team effort – engineers and data scientists pulling together; the problem is that right now I am seeing little of this.

It’s not too late to fix it, but it does need to be fixed. Clearly, sometimes you have to be careful what you wait for…

Professor Wiesław Jerzy Staszewski

AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics – Department of Robotics and Mechatronics

Dr Wieslaw J. Staszewski is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Robotics and Mechatronics at the AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland. He received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Poznań, Poland, in 1985 and 1986, respectively, and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Victoria University of Manchester, UK, in 1994. He worked for three years in the Technical University of Poznan, Poland. He then spent six years, including eighteen months British Council Fellowship at the Victoria University of Manchester, UK. In 1995 he joined the Deaprtment of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Sheffield, UK, where he was promoted to a Personal Chair in 2005. He joined the AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow in September 2011.
Prof. Staszewski has experience of research collaborative projects both in the UK and Europe, working with industrial partners and academia. His research interest includes topics related to structural dynamics, structural health monitoring, condition monitoring and smart structures/materials. He is the author of over 500 research publications, predominantly in the damage detection and advanced signal processing areas. This includes 22 book contributions and over 180 refereed journal papers. Prof. Staszewski is the Associate Editor of five international journals, including Smart Materials and Structures, Structural Health Monitoring and Structural Control and Health Monitoring. He has been involved in organisation of a number of international conferences and invited to present seminars, lectures, conference keynote addresses in the UK, Europe, USA and Asia. Prof. Staszewski a Chartered Engineer, a Fellow of the Institute of Physics.

“In-direct Operational Data Analysis for Health and Condition Monitoring 
of Engineering Structures and Machines”

Structural damage/fault detection under variable and operational conditions is one of the major challenges in maintenance and monitoring of modern infrastructure and engineering machinery. Recent research developments demonstrate that operational data from such structures and machines – that are already available to end-user – can be successfully used to tackle this difficult problem. A number of in-direct applications will be presented to show how operational data can be used in-directly to monitor potential aircraft structural damage, detect aircraft hard landing events, detect faults and monitor abnormal operational conditions in wind turbines, detect structural damage due to earthquakes. The research work presented will involve the application of machine learning and co-integration analysis of non-stationary operational data. The major advantage of the methods presented is that no additional sensors, monitoring and expensive hardware is needed to maintain important and critical structures/machines.

Deadlines​

Start of registration:  15 March 2020
Registration for industry :  May 2020
Deadline for abstracts submission:  15 June 2020
Notification of abstracts acceptance:  30 June 2020
Deadline for full papers submission:  31 July 2020
Deadline for registration:  31 August 2020
Deadline for conference fee:  early: 1 July 2020
late: 31 August 2020

Start of registration:
15 March 2020

Registration for industry :
May 2020

Deadline for abstracts submission:
15 June 2020

Notification of abstracts acceptance:
30 June 2020

Deadline for full papers submission:
31 July 2020

Deadline for registration:
31 August 2020

Fees

Registration fee Early
15.03.2020 – 01.07.2020
Late
02.07.2020 – 31.08.2020
Participants 400€ / 1800 PLN 450 € / 2000 PLN
Participants from industry 300€ / 1300 PLN 350 € / 1500 PLN
Young Scientists 250 € / 1000 PLN 300 € / 1300 PLN
Accompanying Persons 200 € / 900 PLN 250 € / 1000 PLN
Registration fee Early
15.03.2020 – 01.07.2020
Late
02.07.2020 – 31.08.2020
Participants 400€ / 1800 PLN 450 € / 2000 PLN
Participants from industry 300€ / 1300 PLN 350 € / 1500 PLN
Young Scientists 250 € / 1000 PLN 300 € / 1300 PLN
Accompanying Persons 200 € / 900 PLN 250 € / 1000 PLN